Currently Reading: Postmodernism, 1920s, and Fiction

This semester is pretty crazy for me as I am sure some of you have noticed I have not been posting as much because I have no time! My last semester is jam-packed and I’ve been reading a book a week alongside 200 pages of required reading for classes and writing up articles for my job at The Chrony.

Just to keep in touch,

Here is my current reading list (NOT including required reading for class)


“Beyond Gatsby: How Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Writers of the 1920’s shaped American Culture” 


“The 42nd Parallel by John Dos Passos”


“Explaining Postmodernism by Stephen R.C. Hicks” 


“Cinderella’s Big Score by Maria Raha” 

and still reading


“Gotham Writers’ Workshop: Writing Fiction”


“Dracula by Bram Stoker” (a regular ‘re-read’ of mine)


“Frankenstein by Mary Shelley” (another regular ‘re-read’ of mine)


This is just a quick cap of what I am currently reading the real list is about 18 books.

I hope to have review posts finished within the next few weeks. The review posts will be on “Gotham Writers’ Workshop: Writing Fiction” and


“Hemingway’s Paris: A User’s Guide by John Baxter” 

I read “Hemingway’s Paris” recently and found it to be extremely fascinating for its content and concise writing style.


Thank you to all my regular readers and followers for sticking with me! 



What to Expect: Discussions and Book Reviews


My last semester in college has now officially started and I am thrilled to be one step away from graduating. Because my workload is pretty heavy this semester my posts may seem sparse but I will not disappear completely.

What to Expect from me by the end of January and in February,

Book Reviews:

“Writers Gone Wild” by Bill Peschel

“Imaginations” by William Carlos Williams

“Gotham Writers’ Workshop: Writing Fiction”


I will be emphasizing on short short stories and fiction for the next few months due to my increasing interest in writing in both styles. If anyone has any suggestions or would like me to tackle a specific topic related to these styles please leave a comment below. I would love to have an online discussion on this topic and involve as many writers as possible.

Thank you to all my followers and regular readers that continue to stick with me and read my work! I am deeply grateful for your attention and dedication.



Why I Write: Poetry #1

I want to play around a bit and start up a new series of posts that I plan on continuing into the New Year. I will call this series “Why I Write” and I will talk briefly about the various forms, styles, and interests that I have.

For this one, I want to open up a discussion on the never-ending question as to why people choose to write and/or read poetry. This will be a personal post, in that I will be pulling from my own experiences and background in writing poetry and maybe talk about where I’d like to go in the future.


Poetry #1: The Root of the Obsession

I did not get into Poetry until I was about 19 maybe 20 years old which was not that long ago for me. But in the span of the 4-5 years since then I have come a long way. I use to think that Poetry was some high-brow artistic form of writing that I would never be able to understand let alone write regardless of me already being an avid reader and dabbler in writing. This fear is not unknown to people who have been interested in Poetry and it is, in fact, a common trait. It is probably because of the literary history of Poetry and it’s importance to all civilizations in terms of culture and time that contribute to its somewhat intimidating prestige.

I was finally broken into poetry in one of my creative writing courses in 2011. In this course, I read Wittgenstein and Maggie Nelson among many others which finally cracked open the world of poetry and creative writing for me. Since then, I have never been the same and have found myself continually wanting to write and explore literature. In only a couple of years, my interests in literature led me to my routines today. I have read numerous books on writing, poetry, and fiction and have maintained a routine of writing for a minimum of one to two hours every day. What can I say about poetry, about writing?

If you love it, do it.

It’s worth it. I have discovered so much valuable knowledge and have worked hard to gain the experience that I have and hope to have in the future just from my unwavering love for writing poetry. It is the insatiable desire to learn, read, and write more that has led me to where I am now. It is humble times but it is a beginning of a future I hope is successful.

For me, I write because I feel like I need to and I would love to open up a discussion for other writers/bloggers and ask, why do you write? and when did it start to become something serious for you?

Please leave responses in the comments below. If you would like for me to write on a topic related to this let me know.


Thank you for reading my work! I hope you will return in the future! 


Response to Jane Eyre and Discussion on Creating Complex Characters


Jane Eyre
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I recently finished reading for nth time Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte  (first published 1847) I find myself usually rereading this novel every winter out of habit. I love this novel for so many different reasons but the main one being that Jane is smart, witty and stands up for herself which should not be taken lightly. The novel is set in the early to mid 19th century and revolves around the story of Jane Eyre from her youth to adult years. Her life story is full of loneliness, pain, seclusion, and hardship. The main subject of the novel is the love story between Jane and Mr. Rochester, a man about twenty years her senior who hires Jane as a governess for a child he has taken into his home. Besides the love story, a plot which is full of drama and secrets, there are aspects of the novel that really stand out to me.

I am a Writer, obviously, and I do like to write in short fiction. Fiction is a genre that resounds with me on a creative level whenever I may have too many words for just poems. The issue of creating characters that are not one dimensional is one of the elements that I find myself occupied with the most. I have read multiple books with advice on how to create lifelike three-dimensional characters through writing and I found myself amazed (yet again) when reading Bronte’s writing the details and layers that she uses in making Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester so complex. A reoccurring theme in most of the books on fiction writing that I read is that adding complexities to your character (for instance a character that hates liars but in fact lies constantly) is one of the ways in which your character can come to life. A key piece of advice that keeps popping up for me now is also, “Show, don’t tell.” Which is a part of my writing that I have struggled with from the beginning.

How do I show readers through words what my character is like as a person? How do I do this through dialogue, action, and narration without making my writing feel forced?

I know this is not a new question and it is a possibility that whoever reads this post may be dealing with the same obstacles in their own writing. If so, I would love to read some comments on how you, as a writer, try to create complex lifelike characters, what books have you read? what advice have you heard?

As for me, here are a few books that I have read (or am reading) that have been invaluable in my constant learning to write regardless if its fiction, prose, or poetry.



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Writing Fiction: The Practical Guide from New York’s Acclaimed Creative Writing School




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Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within by Natalie Goldberg



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Bird by Bird: Some Instruction on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott


On Writing: A Memoir Of The Craft by [King, Stephen]
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On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft


I am constantly searching for more books about writing, how to write, and study literature. If anyone has any suggestions please leave them in a comment below! If you would like me to respond to a question about writing please also feel free to message me or leave the question in a comment below!

Thank you so much to all my readers (new and old) for taking time out of your day to read my writing! I hope you will return in the future!





Reflection/Response: Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice

I have most recently finished Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. These two novels are classics of the western European literary tradition and question social status, class, and gender-related issues of 19th century England. I enjoyed both for different reasons and at the same time had my own complications with the two.

Pride and Prejudice (published 1813)

The characters are vibrant and possess a lot of stubborn vigor when it comes to family and gossip. The socio-cultural habits of middle-class and upper-class (somewhat royalty) families are the main subject of this book revolving around complicated marriages, friendships, and of course the tumultuous romance between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy. I enjoyed reading this novel again purely because the dialogue is extremely witty and the plot is full of plenty of drama. My complication, or struggle, with this book is probably the same as anyone else’s Elizabeth and Darcy’s behavior, mainly their stubbornness and arrogance which is sometimes frustrating and painful to read. I love Elizabeth for her honest and straight-forward ‘say-it-like-it-is’ style which I think is refreshing to read and comforting. Overall it is a novel I would read again at any opportunity.

Wuthering Heights (published 1847)

This is a much darker more tragic novel than Pride and Prejudice, it is not a happy romance. Lockwood rents a home from Heathcliff and what results is a long story told to  Lockwood by Nelly, a housekeeper about the complicated history of Heathcliff and Catherine’s love and the generation after. Illness, madness (mental illness), rage, and abuse are consistent throughout. There are mysterious elements in this novel such as ghost stories and apparitions, and I believe this could be considered a Gothic Novel. My complication with this story was the role of Nelly, she is the narrator and ultimately a complete meddler in people’s affairs but she has no family, few friends, and is a life-long servant to the two main households in the story making Nelly, in my opinion, an equally complex character to that of Heathcliff and Catherine. I found this novel interesting and heart-wrenching but I gradually became more curious about the possible inspiration or reasons that Emily Bronte would write such a book. Overall I am impressed by this novel and I have been struggling to think of anything I’ve ever read that could be similar to it that is from the same century.

I wanted to give brief reflections on these two novels, to keep it short and sweet. Usually, I would include a little background info on Emily Bronte and Jane Austen but I am thinking about posting a small summary of the lives of Emily and Charlotte Bronte as well as Jane Austen sometime soon. I am currently reading Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte for the nth time (it is one of my all-time favorites) I have no idea how many times I have read this novel but it is incredible and I love it, do expect a reflection/response post to this novel as well!

Thank you for reading my reflections and writing, I hope that you will return in the future! 




What to Expect: Book Reviews and Reflections

I plan on writing up some reviews/reflections on a few of the following books this month. I have yet to choose which ones from this list of what I am currently reading.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan

Democracy, Culture and the Voice of Poetry by Robert Pinsky

Three Guineas by Virginia Woolf

Satanic Feminism: Lucifer as the Liberator of Woman in Nineteenth-Century Culture by Per Faxneld

I am really leaning towards a reflection of Wuthering Heights for sure and a review of Democracy, Culture and the Voice of Poetry.


Marilyn Manson’s latest release ‘Heaven Upside Down’

After years of Marilyn Manson and countless albums, we’ve come to ‘Heaven Upside Down‘ released only a couple weeks ago. ‘Heaven Upside Down’ calls back to the era of Manson where blame was put on the shock rocker for multiple problems within society (notably the Columbine Shootings which would mark Manson for the rest of his career).  Marilyn Manson a.k.a. Brian Warner seeks to shake the public from the comfort it finds within institutions that dumb them down and constricts them to beliefs that may be seen as more harmful (his opinion) than beneficial (Christian religions). It is worth it to look into the philosophical beliefs that Manson has himself and to acknowledge that behind his in your face attitude and abrasive personal beliefs there lies a man that is more brain and wits than just pure “Fuck You!” anthems on repeat.

‘Heaven Upside Down’ reminds me of a few earlier albums by Manson such as Mechanical Animals, Holy Wood, and The Golden Age of Grotesque (albums from the years 1998-2003). The ‘pop-iest’ song on the album I feel would be ‘KILL4ME’ that hooks listeners into a repeated chorus “Would you kill kill kill for me?”, a reminiscent love song that harkens back to the overwhelming betrayal and questioning in ‘The Golden Age of Grotesque’. There are also many songs on the album that comment on the socio-political state of America right now giving the album more weight with its sharp lyrical statements and catchy rhythms, songs such as ‘Saturnalia’ ‘Revelation #12’ and ‘WE KNOW WHERE YOU FUCKING LIVE’. A few songs that remind me of the album ‘Mechanical Animals’ would be ‘Je$u$ Cri$i$’ and ‘Blood Honey’. For ‘Holy Wood’ I would argue for ‘SAY10’ and ‘Tattooed in Reverse’. Although I do feel like many of the songs on this album synthesize multiple elements from these three albums, these particular songs could be interchangeable in where they would fit under as songs like those on ‘Mechanical Animals’, ‘Holy Wood’, or ‘The Golden Age of Grotesque’ songs.

This latest album by Manson is a welcomed one. I find relief in the music by one of my favorite artists especially in times like these. I would recommend this album to anyone with an open mind, well versed or new, to the music of Marilyn Manson, it is an album fitting for the season and year but not one to listen to lightly or shuffle through.

Music Videos thus far for songs on the ‘Heaven Upside Down’ album


Thank you for reading my writing! I hope you will return in the future!